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Formin Is Associated with Left-Right Asymmetry in the Pond Snail and the Frog

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Readers on

mendeley
85 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Formin Is Associated with Left-Right Asymmetry in the Pond Snail and the Frog
Published in
Current Biology, February 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2015.12.071
Pubmed ID
Authors

Angus Davison, Gary S. McDowell, Jennifer M. Holden, Harriet F. Johnson, Georgios D. Koutsovoulos, M. Maureen Liu, Paco Hulpiau, Frans Van Roy, Christopher M. Wade, Ruby Banerjee, Fengtang Yang, Satoshi Chiba, John W. Davey, Daniel J. Jackson, Michael Levin, Mark L. Blaxter, Davison, Angus, McDowell, Gary S, Holden, Jennifer M, Johnson, Harriet F, Koutsovoulos, Georgios D, Liu, M Maureen, Hulpiau, Paco, Van Roy, Frans, Wade, Christopher M, Banerjee, Ruby, Yang, Fengtang, Chiba, Satoshi, Davey, John W, Jackson, Daniel J, Levin, Michael, Blaxter, Mark L, Davison A, McDowell GS, Holden JM, Johnson HF, Koutsovoulos GD, Liu MM, Hulpiau P, Van Roy F, Wade CM, Banerjee R, Yang F, Chiba S, Davey JW, Jackson DJ, Levin M, Blaxter ML

Abstract

While components of the pathway that establishes left-right asymmetry have been identified in diverse animals, from vertebrates to flies, it is striking that the genes involved in the first symmetry-breaking step remain wholly unknown in the most obviously chiral animals, the gastropod snails. Previously, research on snails was used to show that left-right signaling of Nodal, downstream of symmetry breaking, may be an ancestral feature of the Bilateria [1, 2]. Here, we report that a disabling mutation in one copy of a tandemly duplicated, diaphanous-related formin is perfectly associated with symmetry breaking in the pond snail. This is supported by the observation that an anti-formin drug treatment converts dextral snail embryos to a sinistral phenocopy, and in frogs, drug inhibition or overexpression by microinjection of formin has a chirality-randomizing effect in early (pre-cilia) embryos. Contrary to expectations based on existing models [3-5], we discovered asymmetric gene expression in 2- and 4-cell snail embryos, preceding morphological asymmetry. As the formin-actin filament has been shown to be part of an asymmetry-breaking switch in vitro [6, 7], together these results are consistent with the view that animals with diverse body plans may derive their asymmetries from the same intracellular chiral elements [8].

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 389 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 4%
Japan 2 2%
United States 2 2%
Finland 1 1%
Norway 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
Argentina 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Colombia 1 1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 72 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 30 35%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 24%
Student > Bachelor 14 16%
Student > Postgraduate 5 6%
Student > Master 4 5%
Other 12 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 51 60%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 5%
Physics and Astronomy 2 2%
Neuroscience 2 2%
Other 7 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 566. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 October 2017.
All research outputs
#6,666
of 8,549,370 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#75
of 7,118 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#501
of 290,308 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#5
of 223 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,549,370 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,118 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 36.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,308 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 223 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.