↓ Skip to main content

Cell Press

Article Metrics

Tornadic Storm Avoidance Behavior in Breeding Songbirds

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, January 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
39 news outlets
blogs
10 blogs
twitter
133 tweeters
facebook
9 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
105 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Tornadic Storm Avoidance Behavior in Breeding Songbirds
Published in
Current Biology, January 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2014.10.079
Pubmed ID
Authors

Henry M. Streby, Gunnar R. Kramer, Sean M. Peterson, Justin A. Lehman, David A. Buehler, David E. Andersen

Abstract

Migration is a common behavior used by animals of many taxa to occupy different habitats during different periods [1]. Migrant birds are categorized as either facultative (i.e., those that are forced to migrate by some proximal cue, often weather) or obligate (i.e., those that migrate on a regular cycle) [2, 3]. During migration, obligate migrants can curtail or delay flights in response to inclement weather or until favorable winds prevail [4, 5], and they can temporarily reorient or reverse direction when ecological or meteorological obstacles are encountered [6]. However, it is not known whether obligate migrants undertake facultative migrations and make large-scale movements in response to proximal cues outside of their regular migration periods [3]. Here, we present the first documentation of obligate long-distance migrant birds undertaking a facultative migration, wherein breeding golden-winged warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera) carrying light-level geolocators [7, 8] performed a >1,500 km 5-day circumvention of a severe tornadic storm. The birds evacuated their breeding territories >24 hr before the arrival of the storm and atmospheric variation associated with it. The probable cue, radiating >1,000 km from tornadic storms [9-11], perceived by birds and influencing bird behavior and movements [12-14], is infrasound (i.e., sound below the range of human hearing). With the predicted increase in severity and frequency of similar storms as anthropogenic climate change progresses [15], understanding large-scale behavioral responses of animals to such events will be an important objective of future research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 133 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 4%
France 2 2%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Unknown 93 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 19%
Researcher 20 19%
Student > Bachelor 14 13%
Unspecified 12 11%
Other 15 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 65 62%
Environmental Science 15 14%
Unspecified 13 12%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 <1%
Other 6 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 490. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2019.
All research outputs
#17,777
of 13,727,342 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#178
of 10,127 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#325
of 298,614 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#5
of 184 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,727,342 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,127 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 42.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,614 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 184 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.