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A Paleozoic Stem Group to Mite Harvestmen Revealed through Integration of Phylogenetics and Development

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, April 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
9 Wikipedia pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Readers on

mendeley
52 Mendeley
Title
A Paleozoic Stem Group to Mite Harvestmen Revealed through Integration of Phylogenetics and Development
Published in
Current Biology, April 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2014.03.039
Pubmed ID
Authors

Garwood RJ, Sharma PP, Dunlop JA, Giribet G, Russell J. Garwood, Prashant P. Sharma, Jason A. Dunlop, Gonzalo Giribet

Abstract

Successfully placing fossils in phylogenies is integral to understanding the tree of life. Crown-group Paleozoic members of the arachnid order Opiliones are indicative of ancient origins and one of the earliest arthropod terrestrialization events [1, 2]. Opiliones epitomize morphological stasis, and all known fossils have been placed within the four extant suborders [3-5]. Here we report a Carboniferous harvestman species, Hastocularis argusgen. nov., sp. nov., reconstructed with microtomography (microCT). Phylogenetic analysis recovers this species, and the Devonian Eophalangium sheari, as members of an extinct harvestman clade. We establish the suborder Tetrophthalmi subordo nov., which bore four eyes, to accommodate H. argus and E. sheari, the latter previously considered to be a phalangid [6-9]. Furthermore, embryonic gene expression in the extant species Phalangium opilio demonstrates vestiges of lateral eye tubercles. These lateral eyes are lost in all crown-group Phalangida, but are observed in both our fossil and outgroup chelicerate orders. These data independently corroborate the diagnosis of two eye pairs in the fossil and demonstrate retention of eyes of separate evolutionary origins in modern harvestmen [10-12]. The discovery of Tetrophthalmi alters molecular divergence time estimates, supporting Carboniferous rather than Devonian diversification for extant suborders and directly impacting inferences of terrestrialization history and biogeography. Multidisciplinary approaches integrating fossil and neontological data increase confidence in phylogenies and elucidate evolutionary history.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 4%
France 2 4%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Finland 1 2%
Colombia 1 2%
New Zealand 1 2%
Unknown 42 81%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 19%
Student > Master 9 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 17%
Professor 7 13%
Researcher 7 13%
Other 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 65%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 19%
Unspecified 3 6%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 148. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 February 2017.
All research outputs
#50,660
of 8,247,986 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#374
of 6,935 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,278
of 178,913 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#21
of 153 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,247,986 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,935 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 34.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 178,913 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 153 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.