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A Magnetic Map Leads Juvenile European Eels to the Gulf Stream

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
53 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
78 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
2 Facebook pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
68 Mendeley
Title
A Magnetic Map Leads Juvenile European Eels to the Gulf Stream
Published in
Current Biology, April 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2017.03.015
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lewis C. Naisbett-Jones, Nathan F. Putman, Jessica F. Stephenson, Sam Ladak, Kyle A. Young

Abstract

Migration allows animals to track the environmental conditions that maximize growth, survival, and reproduction [1-3]. Improved understanding of the mechanisms underlying migrations allows for improved management of species and ecosystems [1-4]. For centuries, the catadromous European eel (Anguilla anguilla) has provided one of Europe's most important fisheries and has sparked considerable scientific inquiry, most recently owing to the dramatic collapse of juvenile recruitment [5]. Larval eels are transported by ocean currents associated with the Gulf Stream System from Sargasso Sea breeding grounds to coastal and freshwater habitats from North Africa to Scandinavia [6, 7]. After a decade or more, maturing adults migrate back to the Sargasso Sea, spawn, and die [8]. However, the migratory mechanisms that bring juvenile eels to Europe and return adults to the Sargasso Sea remain equivocal [9, 10]. Here, we used a "magnetic displacement" experiment [11, 12] to show that the orientation of juvenile eels varies in response to subtle differences in magnetic field intensity and inclination angle along their marine migration route. Simulations using an ocean circulation model revealed that even weakly swimming in the experimentally observed directions at the locations corresponding to the magnetic displacements would increase entrainment of juvenile eels into the Gulf Stream System. These findings provide new insight into the migration ecology and recruitment dynamics of eels and suggest that an adaptive magnetic map, tuned to large-scale features of ocean circulation, facilitates the vast oceanic migrations of the Anguilla genus [7, 13, 14].

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 78 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 66 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 25%
Unspecified 12 18%
Student > Master 9 13%
Researcher 8 12%
Other 6 9%
Other 16 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 49%
Unspecified 15 22%
Environmental Science 9 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 7%
Neuroscience 2 3%
Other 4 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 504. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 September 2019.
All research outputs
#16,523
of 13,628,786 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#171
of 10,077 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#856
of 263,574 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#10
of 194 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,628,786 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,077 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 41.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,574 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 194 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.