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Probing Red Blood Cell Morphology Using High-Frequency Photoacoustics

Overview of attention for article published in Biophysical Journal, July 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#45 of 9,437)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
twitter
12 tweeters
patent
1 patent
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
105 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
134 Mendeley
Title
Probing Red Blood Cell Morphology Using High-Frequency Photoacoustics
Published in
Biophysical Journal, July 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.bpj.2013.05.037
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eric M. Strohm, Elizabeth S.L. Berndl, Michael C. Kolios

Abstract

A method that can rapidly quantify variations in the morphology of single red blood cells (RBCs) using light and sound is presented. When irradiated with a laser pulse, an RBC absorbs the optical energy and emits an ultrasonic pressure wave called a photoacoustic wave. The power spectrum of the resulting photoacoustic wave contains distinctive features that can be used to identify the RBC size and morphology. When particles 5-10 μm in diameter (such as RBCs) are probed with high-frequency photoacoustics, unique periodically varying minima and maxima occur throughout the photoacoustic signal power spectrum at frequencies >100 MHz. The location and distance between spectral minima scale with the size and morphology of the RBC; these shifts can be used to quantify small changes in the morphology of RBCs. Morphological deviations from the normal biconcave RBC shape are commonly associated with disease or infection. Using a single wide-bandwidth transducer sensitive to frequencies between 100 and 500 MHz, we were able to differentiate healthy RBCs from irregularly shaped RBCs (such as echinocytes, spherocytes, and swollen RBCs) with high confidence using a sample size of just 21 RBCs. As each measurement takes only seconds, these methods could eventually be translated to an automated device for rapid characterization of RBC morphology and deployed in a clinical setting to help diagnose RBC pathology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 134 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Germany 2 1%
Canada 2 1%
India 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 124 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 32%
Researcher 19 14%
Student > Master 15 11%
Other 8 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 5%
Other 20 15%
Unknown 22 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 39 29%
Physics and Astronomy 27 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 4%
Other 15 11%
Unknown 24 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 88. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 July 2021.
All research outputs
#405,021
of 22,713,403 outputs
Outputs from Biophysical Journal
#45
of 9,437 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,093
of 194,634 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biophysical Journal
#1
of 88 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,713,403 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,437 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,634 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 88 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.