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Recall of Others’ Actions after Incidental Encoding Reveals Episodic-like Memory in Dogs

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#33 of 9,961)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
132 news outlets
blogs
16 blogs
twitter
105 tweeters
facebook
18 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
125 Mendeley
Title
Recall of Others’ Actions after Incidental Encoding Reveals Episodic-like Memory in Dogs
Published in
Current Biology, December 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2016.09.057
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claudia Fugazza, Ákos Pogány, Ádám Miklósi

Abstract

The existence of episodic memory in non-human animals is a debated topic that has been investigated using different methodologies that reflect diverse theoretical approaches to its definition. A fundamental feature of episodic memory is recalling after incidental encoding, which can be assessed if the recall test is unexpected [1]. We used a modified version of the "Do as I Do" method [2], relying on dogs' ability to imitate human actions, to test whether dogs can rely on episodic memory when recalling others' actions from the past. Dogs were first trained to imitate human actions on command. Next, they were trained to perform a simple training exercise (lying down), irrespective of the previously demonstrated action. This way, we substituted their expectation to be required to imitate with the expectation to be required to lie down. We then tested whether dogs recalled the demonstrated actions by unexpectedly giving them the command to imitate, instead of lying down. Dogs were tested with a short (1 min) and a long (1 hr) retention interval. They were able to recall the demonstrated actions after both intervals; however, their performance declined more with time compared to conditions in which imitation was expected. These findings show that dogs recall past events as complex as human actions even if they do not expect the memory test, providing evidence for episodic-like memory. Dogs offer an ideal model to study episodic memory in non-human species, and this methodological approach allows investigating memory of complex, context-rich events.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 105 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 125 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Brazil 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Germany 1 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Hungary 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 112 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 25%
Researcher 23 18%
Student > Bachelor 21 17%
Student > Master 18 14%
Unspecified 9 7%
Other 23 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 41 33%
Psychology 30 24%
Unspecified 12 10%
Neuroscience 8 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 7 6%
Other 27 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1235. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 August 2019.
All research outputs
#2,481
of 13,472,087 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#33
of 9,961 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#157
of 375,927 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#4
of 197 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,472,087 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,961 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 41.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 375,927 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 197 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.