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Neuronal Prediction of Opponent’s Behavior during Cooperative Social Interchange in Primates

Overview of attention for article published in Cell, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
15 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
64 tweeters
weibo
4 weibo users
facebook
8 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
112 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
396 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Neuronal Prediction of Opponent’s Behavior during Cooperative Social Interchange in Primates
Published in
Cell, March 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2015.01.045
Pubmed ID
Authors

Keren Haroush, Ziv M. Williams

Abstract

A cornerstone of successful social interchange is the ability to anticipate each other's intentions or actions. While generating these internal predictions is essential for constructive social behavior, their single neuronal basis and causal underpinnings are unknown. Here, we discover specific neurons in the primate dorsal anterior cingulate that selectively predict an opponent's yet unknown decision to invest in their common good or defect and distinct neurons that encode the monkey's own current decision based on prior outcomes. Mixed population predictions of the other was remarkably near optimal compared to behavioral decoders. Moreover, disrupting cingulate activity selectively biased mutually beneficial interactions between the monkeys but, surprisingly, had no influence on their decisions when no net-positive outcome was possible. These findings identify a group of other-predictive neurons in the primate anterior cingulate essential for enacting cooperative interactions and may pave a way toward the targeted treatment of social behavioral disorders. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 64 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 396 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 1%
Spain 4 1%
France 3 <1%
China 3 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Other 4 1%
Unknown 370 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 103 26%
Researcher 84 21%
Student > Bachelor 51 13%
Student > Master 31 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 25 6%
Other 72 18%
Unknown 30 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 112 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 99 25%
Psychology 68 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 4%
Computer Science 16 4%
Other 41 10%
Unknown 43 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 196. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 March 2020.
All research outputs
#107,800
of 17,413,731 outputs
Outputs from Cell
#686
of 15,578 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,649
of 221,632 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell
#9
of 142 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,413,731 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 15,578 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 42.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 221,632 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 142 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.