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Volatile evolution of long noncoding RNA repertoires: mechanisms and biological implications.

Overview of attention for article published in Trends in Genetics, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#21 of 1,605)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
47 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
97 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
248 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
Volatile evolution of long noncoding RNA repertoires: mechanisms and biological implications.
Published in
Trends in Genetics, September 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.tig.2014.08.004
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aurélie Kapusta, Cédric Feschotte, Kapusta A, Feschotte C

Abstract

Thousands of genes encoding long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified in all vertebrate genomes thus far examined. The list of lncRNAs partaking in arguably important biochemical, cellular, and developmental activities is steadily growing. However, it is increasingly clear that lncRNA repertoires are subject to weak functional constraint and rapid turnover during vertebrate evolution. We discuss here some of the factors that may explain this apparent paradox, including relaxed constraint on sequence to maintain lncRNA structure/function, extensive redundancy in the regulatory circuits in which lncRNAs act, as well as adaptive and non-adaptive forces such as genetic drift. We explore the molecular mechanisms promoting the birth and rapid evolution of lncRNA genes, with an emphasis on the influence of bidirectional transcription and transposable elements, two pervasive features of vertebrate genomes. Together these properties reveal a remarkably dynamic and malleable noncoding transcriptome which may represent an important source of robustness and evolvability.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 47 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 248 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 3 1%
France 3 1%
United Kingdom 3 1%
Brazil 3 1%
Spain 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 228 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 72 29%
Researcher 66 27%
Student > Master 32 13%
Student > Bachelor 16 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 15 6%
Other 47 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 154 62%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 55 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 5%
Unspecified 9 4%
Computer Science 5 2%
Other 13 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 41. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 February 2018.
All research outputs
#312,451
of 11,563,317 outputs
Outputs from Trends in Genetics
#21
of 1,605 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,191
of 197,811 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trends in Genetics
#2
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,563,317 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,605 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 197,811 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.