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Crossmodal Induction of Thalamocortical Potentiation Leads to Enhanced Information Processing in the Auditory Cortex

Overview of attention for article published in Neuron, February 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#31 of 6,918)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

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42 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
145 Mendeley
Title
Crossmodal Induction of Thalamocortical Potentiation Leads to Enhanced Information Processing in the Auditory Cortex
Published in
Neuron, February 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.neuron.2013.11.023
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emily Petrus, Amal Isaiah, Adam P. Jones, David Li, Hui Wang, Hey-Kyoung Lee, Patrick O. Kanold

Abstract

Sensory systems do not work in isolation; instead, they show interactions that are specifically uncovered during sensory loss. To identify and characterize these interactions, we investigated whether visual deprivation leads to functional enhancement in primary auditory cortex (A1). We compared sound-evoked responses of A1 neurons in visually deprived animals to those from normally reared animals. Here, we show that visual deprivation leads to improved frequency selectivity as well as increased frequency and intensity discrimination performance of A1 neurons. Furthermore, we demonstrate in vitro that in adults visual deprivation strengthens thalamocortical (TC) synapses in A1, but not in primary visual cortex (V1). Because deafening potentiated TC synapses in V1, but not A1, crossmodal TC potentiation seems to be a general property of adult cortex. Our results suggest that adults retain the capability for crossmodal changes whereas such capability is absent within a sensory modality. Thus, multimodal training paradigms might be beneficial in sensory-processing disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 145 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 3%
United Kingdom 3 2%
Switzerland 2 1%
Germany 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Hungary 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Unknown 131 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 45 31%
Researcher 32 22%
Student > Master 12 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 8%
Student > Bachelor 11 8%
Other 33 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 64 44%
Neuroscience 39 27%
Psychology 14 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 7%
Unspecified 7 5%
Other 11 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 363. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 March 2015.
All research outputs
#23,364
of 11,600,740 outputs
Outputs from Neuron
#31
of 6,918 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#423
of 209,868 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuron
#2
of 136 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,600,740 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,918 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 209,868 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 136 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.