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The Dual Nature of Early-Life Experience on Somatosensory Processing in the Human Infant Brain

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
37 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
329 tweeters
facebook
15 Facebook pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
49 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
186 Mendeley
Title
The Dual Nature of Early-Life Experience on Somatosensory Processing in the Human Infant Brain
Published in
Current Biology, April 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2017.02.036
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nathalie L. Maitre, Alexandra P. Key, Olena D. Chorna, James C. Slaughter, Pawel J. Matusz, Mark T. Wallace, Micah M. Murray

Abstract

Every year, 15 million preterm infants are born, and most spend their first weeks in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) [1]. Although essential for the support and survival of these infants, NICU sensory environments are dramatically different from those in which full-term infants mature and thus likely impact the development of functional brain organization [2]. Yet the integrity of sensory systems determines effective perception and behavior [3, 4]. In neonates, touch is a cornerstone of interpersonal interactions and sensory-cognitive development [5-7]. NICU treatments used to improve neurodevelopmental outcomes rely heavily on touch [8]. However, we understand little of how brain maturation at birth (i.e., prematurity) and quality of early-life experiences (e.g., supportive versus painful touch) interact to shape the development of the somatosensory system [9]. Here, we identified the spatial, temporal, and amplitude characteristics of cortical responses to light touch that differentiate them from sham stimuli in full-term infants. We then utilized this data-driven analytical framework to show that the degree of prematurity at birth determines the extent to which brain responses to light touch (but not sham) are attenuated at the time of discharge from the hospital. Building on these results, we showed that, when controlling for prematurity and analgesics, supportive experiences (e.g., breastfeeding, skin-to-skin care) are associated with stronger brain responses, whereas painful experiences (e.g., skin punctures, tube insertions) are associated with reduced brain responses to the same touch stimuli. Our results shed crucial insights into the mechanisms through which common early perinatal experiences may shape the somatosensory scaffolding of later perceptual, cognitive, and social development.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 329 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 186 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Greece 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 182 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 37 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 16%
Researcher 26 14%
Student > Bachelor 18 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 8%
Other 39 21%
Unknown 21 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 43 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 30 16%
Neuroscience 30 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 6%
Other 27 15%
Unknown 27 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 587. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 January 2020.
All research outputs
#17,364
of 15,917,403 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#167
of 11,193 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#654
of 262,989 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#7
of 199 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,917,403 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,193 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 45.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,989 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 199 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.