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Plants and Soil Microbes Respond to Recent Warming on the Antarctic Peninsula

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, September 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
14 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
38 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
35 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
68 Mendeley
Title
Plants and Soil Microbes Respond to Recent Warming on the Antarctic Peninsula
Published in
Current Biology, September 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2013.07.011
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jessica Royles, Matthew J. Amesbury, Peter Convey, Howard Griffiths, Dominic A. Hodgson, Melanie J. Leng, Dan J. Charman

Abstract

Annual temperatures on the Antarctic Peninsula, one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, have risen by up to 0.56°C per decade since the 1950s. Terrestrial and marine organisms have shown changes in populations and distributions over this time, suggesting that the ecology of the Antarctic Peninsula is changing rapidly. However, these biological records are shorter in length than the meteorological data, and observed population changes cannot be securely linked to longer-term trends apparent in paleoclimate data. We developed a unique time series of past moss growth and soil microbial activity from a 150-year-old moss bank at the southern limit of significant plant growth based on accumulation rates, cellulose δ(13)C, and fossil testate amoebae. We show that growth rates and microbial productivity have risen rapidly since the 1960s, consistent with temperature changes, although recently they may have stalled. The recent increase in terrestrial plant growth rates and soil microbial activity are unprecedented in the last 150 years and are consistent with climate change. Future changes in terrestrial biota are likely to track projected temperature increases closely and will fundamentally change the ecology and appearance of the Antarctic Peninsula.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 38 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Chile 2 3%
Brazil 2 3%
Australia 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Argentina 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
Unknown 57 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 22%
Researcher 15 22%
Professor 9 13%
Student > Master 9 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 3 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 41%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 14 21%
Environmental Science 11 16%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 6 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 151. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 December 2019.
All research outputs
#101,795
of 13,995,512 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#633
of 10,253 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,218
of 159,604 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#14
of 167 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,995,512 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,253 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 42.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 159,604 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 167 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.