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Mnemonic Training Reshapes Brain Networks to Support Superior Memory

Overview of attention for article published in Neuron, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 4,838)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
137 news outlets
blogs
17 blogs
twitter
285 tweeters
facebook
13 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
203 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
Mnemonic Training Reshapes Brain Networks to Support Superior Memory
Published in
Neuron, March 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.neuron.2017.02.003
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martin Dresler, William R. Shirer, Boris N. Konrad, Nils C.J. Müller, Isabella C. Wagner, Guillén Fernández, Michael Czisch, Michael D. Greicius, Dresler, Martin, Shirer, William R., Konrad, Boris N., Müller, Nils C.J., Wagner, Isabella C., Fernández, Guillén, Czisch, Michael, Greicius, Michael D.

Abstract

Memory skills strongly differ across the general population; however, little is known about the brain characteristics supporting superior memory performance. Here we assess functional brain network organization of 23 of the world's most successful memory athletes and matched controls with fMRI during both task-free resting state baseline and active memory encoding. We demonstrate that, in a group of naive controls, functional connectivity changes induced by 6 weeks of mnemonic training were correlated with the network organization that distinguishes athletes from controls. During rest, this effect was mainly driven by connections between rather than within the visual, medial temporal lobe and default mode networks, whereas during task it was driven by connectivity within these networks. Similarity with memory athlete connectivity patterns predicted memory improvements up to 4 months after training. In conclusion, mnemonic training drives distributed rather than regional changes, reorganizing the brain's functional network organization to enable superior memory performance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 285 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 203 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 202 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 57 28%
Researcher 43 21%
Student > Bachelor 27 13%
Student > Master 24 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 5%
Other 41 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 44 22%
Psychology 43 21%
Neuroscience 32 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 26 13%
Unspecified 13 6%
Other 45 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1426. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 June 2017.
All research outputs
#688
of 7,933,770 outputs
Outputs from Neuron
#1
of 4,838 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75
of 229,073 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuron
#1
of 131 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,933,770 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,838 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,073 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 131 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.