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A Modern Descendant of Early Green Algal Phagotrophs

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, June 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Citations

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36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
99 Mendeley
Title
A Modern Descendant of Early Green Algal Phagotrophs
Published in
Current Biology, June 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2013.04.063
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shinichiro Maruyama, Eunsoo Kim

Abstract

Green algae, land plants, and other photosynthetic eukaryotes possess plastids, such as chloroplasts, which have evolved from cyanobacterial ancestors via endosymbiosis. An early evolutionary merger between heterotrophic eukaryotes and cyanobacteria called primary endosymbiosis gave rise to the first photosynthetic eukaryotes. A series of plastid acquisitions involving engulfment of eukaryotic phototrophs, known as secondary or tertiary endosymbiosis, followed. Through these repeated symbiotic events, photosynthesis spread across a number of eukaryotic lineages. While the origin of eukaryotic photosynthesis was undoubtedly a fundamentally important evolutionary event in Earth's history, without which much of the modern marine phytoplankton would not exist, the cellular processes that shaped this initial plastid genesis remain largely unknown. Here, we report ultrastructural evidence for bacterial phagocytosis in a primary plastid-bearing alga. This mixotrophic green alga utilizes a mouth-like opening, a tubular channel, and a large permanent vacuole to engulf, transport, and digest bacterial cells. This mode of phagocytosis, likely inherited from its plastid-lacking ancestor, differs from those displayed by many other eukaryotes, including animals, amoebas, and ciliates. These results provide insight into the key phagocytosis step during the origin of the first photosynthetic eukaryotes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 99 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 3 3%
Germany 2 2%
United States 2 2%
Brazil 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
Russia 1 1%
Argentina 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 85 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 27%
Researcher 27 27%
Student > Master 13 13%
Unspecified 9 9%
Student > Bachelor 7 7%
Other 16 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 58 59%
Unspecified 13 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 10%
Environmental Science 10 10%
Physics and Astronomy 3 3%
Other 5 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 51. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 April 2014.
All research outputs
#273,518
of 12,078,939 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#1,225
of 9,110 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,293
of 135,722 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#22
of 155 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,078,939 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,110 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 37.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 135,722 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 155 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.